This unbeatable Huawei P30 offer gets you a 5GB SIM at no

first_imgDeals Coming in at a total cost of £699 over two years – the same price for a SIM-free P30 smartphone – this incredible 5GB contract from Vodafone should not be missed.Now that Huawei’s P30 smartphone is here – scoring a superb 8/10 rating here at Trusted Reviews – the next order is business is finding the best deal possible. Luckily for you, we’ve done just that as Vodafone’s 5GB contract won’t cost you a penny more than if you went for a SIM-free model, but this way you can spread the cost out over two years. Unbeatable Huawei P30 DealHuawei P30 – 5GB of data on VodafoneThis brilliant P30 contract from Vodafone ends up costing the same amount as a SIM-free model, allowing you to effectively get a 5GB monthly SIM at no extra cost.Mobiles.co.uk|£75 upfront|£26/monthView Deal£26/month|£75 upfront|Mobiles.co.uk We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. If you’ve got the money to fork out £699 in one go then I doff my hat, but for the rest of us, just £75 upfront and only £26 a month is much easier to contend with, plus you’ll also get access to Vodafone’s VeryMe programme which provides weekly freebies ranging from cinema tickets to cups of coffee.Plus, 5GB of data is more than enough to see you through a hefty heap of social media and then some. You might even have some data left in the tank to dabble in a bit of YouTube.Buy now: Huawei P30 with 5GB Vodafone SIMGetting back to the phone at hand, the P30 is a worthy successor to the stellar groundwork laid out by the P20. This time around however, people opting for Huawei’s more affordable option in its latest smartphone range won’t miss out on the Leica tri-camera system.In our review for the P30, Alastair Stevenson wrote: “The Huawei P30 has an incredibly competent camera setup that’s more than good enough for most users and a marked step up on the P20 Pro. From a hardware perspective, there are a few reasons for this. Unbeatable Huawei P30 DealHuawei P30 – 5GB of data on VodafoneThis brilliant P30 contract from Vodafone ends up costing the same amount as a SIM-free model, allowing you to effectively get a 5GB monthly SIM at no extra cost.Mobiles.co.uk|£75 upfront|£26/monthView Deal£26/month|£75 upfront|Mobiles.co.uk For starters, Huawei’s tweaked the 40-megapixel sensor to capture using an RYYB (red, yellow, yellow, blue) pixel arrangement. This is a variation on the conventional RGB (red, green, blue) arrangement seen on most smartphone camera sensors.”If your Instagram shots are in need of a serious boost then you owe it to yourself to jump at this fantastic Huawei P30 deal while it’s still available. Given that it comes at no extra cost to a SIM-free model, we can’t imagine it sticking around for too long.For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs.center_img Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.last_img read more

Microsoft hilariously outlines acceptable Xbox Live trash talk

first_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Xbox Live trash talk can get pretty heated, given opponents are often separated by thousands of miles and multiple generations (and home planets, if you’ve seen Avengers: Endgame), but Microsoft wants you to keep it clean and avoid saying despicable things about other people’s mothers.Sometimes, in the heat of the moment, it’s easy to get carried away and cross the line when engaging in a brutal online battle. However, Microsoft is hoping you’ll keep those instincts in check and is explicitly pointing out exactly where the line is, so you can avoid a ban.The company has recently updated its community standards document outlining – and you’ll love this – what classes as ‘acceptable’ trash talk and what crosses over into personal abuse or harassment. Here’s what the company has to say on the matter (via Kotaku):Acceptable trash talk includes:Get destroyed. Can’t believe you thought you were on my level.That was some serious potato aim. Get wrecked.Only reason you went positive was you spent all game camping. Try again, kid.Cheap win. Come at me when you can actually drive without running cars off the road.That sucked. Get good and then come back when your k/d’s over 1.Going too far looks like:Get . Can’t believe you thought you were on my level.Hey , that was some serious potato aim. Get wrecked, trash.Only reason you went positive was you spent all game camping. KYS, kid.Cheap win. Totally expected from a .You suck. Get out of my country—maybe they’ll let you back in when your k/d’s over 1.Microsoft also advises users to keep everything light hearted and avoid behaving in a manner that could “harm someone’s experience.” We really hope none of our readers have ever used during in-game chat!Related: Best Xbox One games 2019The firm adds: “Trash talk includes any lighthearted banter or bragging that focuses on the game at hand and encourages healthy competition. Harassment includes any negative behavior that’s personalized, disruptive, or likely to make someone feel unwelcome or unsafe.“To qualify as harassment, the behavior doesn’t have to be drawn-out or persistent. Even a single abusive message could harm someone’s experience. Know when to draw the line, when to back off. Know and respect the other player.”Have you ever crossed the line with your Xbox Live trash talk and had to apologise? Or have you fallen victim to mean-spirited banter and left the platform? Let us know @TrustedReviews on Twitter. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.last_img read more

JOBS JOBS JOBS Americas unemployment rate is now the lowest its been

first_img‘JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!’ America’s unemployment rate is now the lowest it’s been in almost 50 years U.S. stocks opened higher as the surge in job growth Join the conversation → Twitter Jeff Kearns and Reade Pickert Email More Bloomberg News U.S. hiring topped forecasts in April.Sarah Blesener/Bloomberg U.S. hiring topped forecasts in April as the jobless rate dipped to a fresh 49-year low and wage gains were slightly cooler than projected, suggesting the still-healthy labour market can continue to support growth without fuelling inflation.Payrolls climbed by 263,000 after a downwardly revised 189,000 advance the prior month, according to a Labor Department report Friday that exceeded all estimates in a Bloomberg’s survey. The jobless rate unexpectedly fell to 3.6 per cent while average hourly earnings growth was unchanged at 3.2 per cent, below projections.JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!“Jobs surge in April, unemployment rate falls to the lowest since 1969” https://t.co/4DGpumMISf— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 3, 2019U.S. stock futures held their gains after the report. The fed funds futures market briefly showed a slight reduction in odds for a Federal Reserve rate cut this year, before returning to where it was prior to the data, following calls from President Donald Trump and others for a reduction to support the expansion. Policy makers reiterated their patient stance this week as Chairman Jerome Powell cited “very strong job creation” while noting weaker inflation.Here’s what the analyst say:“It’s clearly telling you this economy is still chugging along very nicely,” Torsten Slok, chief economist at Deutsche Bank Securities, said on Bloomberg Television. “It is inflationary in the sense that wages did go up but they didn’t go up as much as we had expected.”Related Stories:U.S. job growth surges, July rate cut expectations intactCanada’s jobs market stalls after strong start to yearAmerica’s economy and wages are cooling but not its female workforce“Goldilocks is the best description of this,” Slok said.The surprising robustness follows months of broad labour market strength. While the expansion is poised to become the nation’s longest on record at midyear, economists expect a deceleration this year even after a strong first quarter.Revisions for February and March added 16,000 more jobs than previously reported, while the three-month average fell to 169,000.Friday’s data follow a Federal Open Market Committee statement Wednesday saying “the labor market remains strong.” Officials in March forecast a 3.7 per cent unemployment rate at year end.Payroll DetailsThe payroll gains were somewhat uneven, with construction, health care, and professional and business services posting gains while retail employment fell by 12,000 for a third- straight decline.Construction payrolls climbed by 33,000, the most since January, as manufacturing employment rose by 4,000. Factory employment was unchanged in the prior month after a previously reported drop.Average hourly earnings rose 0.2 per cent from the prior month after a revised 0.2 per cent rise in the prior period. Wages for production and nonsupervisory workers accelerated to a 3.4 percent annual pace, signalling gains for lower-paid employees.While the historically tight labour market has pushed companies to raise pay, inflation appears largely subdued, as the fatter paycheques don’t show any sign of fuelling faster price gains.At the same time, the average workweek got slightly shorter, boosting average hourly pay. The average for all private employees decreased to 34.4 hours, from 34.5 hours.Other DetailsThe U-6, or underemployment rate, held at 7.3 per cent; the gauge includes part-time workers who’d prefer a full-time position and people who want a job but aren’t actively looking.The participation rate, or share of working-age people in the labor force, decreased to 62.8 per cent from 63 percent.Private employment rose by 236,000 after increasing 179,000; government payrolls climbed by 27,000.Bloomberg.com Sponsored By: ← Previous Next → Share this story’JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!’ America’s unemployment rate is now the lowest it’s been in almost 50 years Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Facebook Reddit May 3, 201911:51 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Comment Featured Stories advertisement 12 Comments What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Recommended For YouTop Delaware defense lawyer switches sides, joins shareholder shopPelosi says she would like to have U.S. debt limit proposal on House floor by July 25Von der Leyen cracks EU parliament nut, national leaders will prove tougherIMF sees dangers from trade tensions, overvalued dollarBrazil wants cars, sugar in Mercosur customs union -Bolsonaro last_img read more

BMW i3 As A Cash Cow

Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 13, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News UK Government To Invest $42 Million In V2G Technology BMW i ChargeForward – supports the grid and the pocket.Since 2015, BMW and PG&E offers for its customers in the San Francisco Bay Area in California a special “BMW i ChargeForward” related to plug-in car charging.The idea is to enable PG&E to take control of the charging of the car connected to the charging station to lower peak demand, increase usage of renewable sources and, in general, to stabilize the grid in exchange for money.The BMW i ChargeForward began in 2015 with 100 BMW i3 and now some 350 BMW/MINI and PG&E customers are onboard. You can still join the program and get up to $900 in incentives if you qualify (see website here).See Also In Which U.S. Cities Is It Least Expensive To Drive Electric? EVgo Introduces New Grid-Tied Chargers With Second-Life BMW i3 Batteries Source: Electric Vehicle News The main findings from the BMW i ChargeForward, presented at the Governor’s Global Climate Action Summit (12–14 September 2018) in San Francisco, are:Electric vehicles can help stabilizing the public grid and maximizing the portion of renewables.Drivers are willing to change their charging habits in order to align with renewables, given the right messaging and incentives.Energy companies can help increase daytime charging with renewables by supporting companies in adding workplace charging.Sharing data with other drivers is a motivator for many participants.Programmes like ChargeForward improve customers’ understanding of how the grid works, which helps them become more educated energy consumers.More in the press blast:“The bottom line is that owners of all electrified cars could be able to make their high-voltage batteries available as a flexibility buffer for power generated from renewable sources. At the same time, they could receive bonuses by charging their vehicle at the best possible time of day – and therefore maximising the proportion of solar energy they use – whether they are at home or out and about and using a public charging facility.„Our target is to offer charging power generated with the lowest possible CO2 emissions at most attractive prices to drivers of our electric cars”, says Dr. Joachim Kolling, Head of BMW Group Mobility and Energy Services“As California advances toward a carbon free economy, this collaboration demonstrates how utilities and automakers can partner to more efficiently utilize the grid through smart and managed charging. Together we are paving the way for the rapid growth of electric cars and achieving a clean and sustainable energy future”, adds Steve Malnight, Senior Vice President, Energy Supply and Policy Pacific Gas & Electric.ChargeForward brings CO2-neutral electric mobilityand efficient, environment-friendly electricitysupplyanother step closer together. The innovation project launched byBMW iand power supplier Pacific Gas&Electric (PG&E) in theSan Francisco Bay AreainCalifornia has been running since 2015. Currently,350 owners of electrified vehicles from the BMW and MINI brands who also have aPG&E supply contract are taking part in the pioneering fleet trial.TheChargeForward pilot projectin Californiais stepping up the ways in which electric mobilitycan link with eco-friendly changes inenergy use. The project is bridging the gap between electric vehicles and the public gridwith at echnology that hasthe potential to make electric driving emission-free not only locally but across the board. Key elements here include daily forecasts from energy providers on when and how much electricity from renewable sources will be available on thegrid. Customer requirements and preferences regarding vehicle usage periods and parking times are also taken into account. The ConnectedDrive telematics unit fitted in all BMW vehicles and the BMW Connected app play a crucial role here.When the ChargeForward project was launched in 2015, around 100 BMWi3 drivers downloaded a ChargeForward app which allowed flexible vehicle charging from the electricity grid. This meant the charging process could be paused when the grid enjoyed particularly high demand and then restarted when the peak had tailed off again. Drivers would be informed of any charging pauses by a message to their smartphone. As a customer only rarely needs to use the whole time their vehicle is parked for charging, in many cases they would be able to benefit from periods when electric isavailable at lower cost. This would also present an easy way for the energy company to avoid grid overloads and ensure consistent and therefore efficient supply.Since2017, the results of the second phase of the project have shown how a flexible charging strategycan contribute not only to stabilising the energy grid but also increasing the proportion of green energy sourced forel ectric mobility. Around EarthDay earlier this year, carefully managed charging in sunny California enabled greater use of electricity generated from renewable sources. Around 350 BMW i car drivers participating in the ChargeForward project were prompted to charge their vehicles’ high-voltage batteries during the day. In this way, they prioritised those periods when solar energy was available in particularly large quantities. This meant approximately 56 per cent of the power they fed into their vehicles during the test period could ultimately be sourced renewably – and more than half of the project participants’mileage in their BMW i3carsduring the test was therefore completely CO2-neutral. By comparison, the average percentage of renewable energy for the US stood at just 22 per cent.The Governor’s Global ClimateAction Summit in San Francisco brings together international representatives from politics and government, environmental associations, business and industry to discuss the impact of climate change and possible measures to counteract it. The event shines the spotlight on ways to reduce CO2emissions generated by humans. TheBMW Group is contributing to the summit in various ways –e.g. witha run-downof the conclusions from the phases of the ChargeForward project completed so far and a presentation of further initiatives aimed at integrating electric mobility into a sustainable and largely CO2-neutral energy supply system.By pressing ahead with the ChargeForward project, BMW iand PG&E are showing their commitment to further incentivising intelligent charging and to incorporating electric vehicles into the public energy grid even more efficiently.In the near future, high-voltage batteries from electrified BMW and MINI cars should be able to not only take on as much renewably sourced electricity as possible, but also feed it back into the grid, when there is a shortage of electricity from renewable resources. By acting as temporary energy storage facilities, they can help to stabilise energy supply. For example, they can be used to cover load peaks inenergy generation from wind and solar power (e.g. on particularly windy or sunny days) and channel the energy stored back into the grid in the evening, whent he sun has set and demand is elevated.” read more

Tesla rushes to reveal earnings on Wednesday for expected near profitable record

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla rushes to deliver its Third Quarter 2018 Financial Results and Webcast on Wednesday, October 24 – a week early.The early earnings come as Tesla is expected to deliver a record quarter and even come close to profitability, according to comments by Elon Musk. more…The post Tesla rushes to reveal earnings on Wednesday for expected ‘near profitable’ record quarter appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Tesla To Close Order Books For Model S X 75D Next Monday

first_imgThus widening the price gap between the Model 3 and its soon-to-be-more-expensive stablemates.After this weekend you’ll no longer be able to order the cheapest current versions of the Tesla Model S and X. Last call for the 75-kWh battery versions.More Tesla News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Was #1 Selling Luxury Car In U.S. In 2018 You can check out pricing and range of all versions of the Tesla Model S and X here. So, come Monday, the Tesla Model S 75D and Tesla Model X 75D will no longer be available for ordering.Tesla CEO Elon Musk made the announcement via Twitter just moments ago.Starting on Monday, Tesla will no longer be taking orders for the 75 kWh version of the Model S & X. If you’d like that version, please order by Sunday night at https://t.co/46TXqRJ3C1— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) January 9, 2019center_img Elon Musk Says New Tesla Roadster Will Fly Is The Tesla Model S Really A Robot Killer? Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

I Bought A Bolt Today — Or … Does GAS trump FUD

first_imgWell, it was last month actually, and I didn’t outright purchase a Chevy Bolt EV, I leased one. I test drove the Bolt back in early 2017 when they first started showing up in dealer showrooms and wrote about the experience. You may know that I’m the proud owner of a day 2 reservation for a Tesla Model 3 and have been patiently waiting for the base model car to start shippingSource: CleanTechnica Car Reviews RSS Feedlast_img

The 2019 PlugIn EVs That Have Less EPARated Range Than In 2018

first_img Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Named Northwest Green Vehicle of the Year 2019 Nissan LEAF Awarded As KBB’s Best EV In 5-Year Ownership Costs Alex On Autos Checks Out Nissan LEAF e-Plus: Video Source: Electric Vehicle News 2019 Chrysler Pacifica HybridChrysler Pacifica Hybrid is another example, which while still having the same 16 kWh battery, will go 1 mile less in the 2019 model year version, according to the EPA. The official rating is 32 miles (51 km), compared to 33 miles previously. Interestingly, the total range also decreased from 570 miles to 520 miles (837 km).2019 Volvo XC90 T8 Twin EngineVolvo XC90 T8 Twin Engine plug-in hybrid got a range bump in 2018 because of a slightly bigger battery, but in 2019 the rating decreased by two miles from 19 to 17 miles (27 km). Volvo consistently increases total range and in 2019 it went up from 380 miles to 490 miles (788 km).We’re not entirely sure what to make of all of these changes, but still we thought it’s worth sharing.center_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 18, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News 2019 Nissan LEAFThe 40 kWh battery version of Nissan LEAF was rated by the EPA at 151 miles, but it seems that this year’s rating is lowered to 150 miles (241 km). According to the EPA label, lower range is the result of slightly higher energy consumption both in city and on the highway.Of course, the LEAF will in the coming months get Nissan LEAF e+ version with 226 miles (364 km), which should be enough for most drivers. One or two miles less is not that much, but it’s still down rather than up.We are accustomed to plug-in electric cars eventually getting a range bump in a new model year (at least if there is an upgrade to a new generation battery). But as we found out recently, in some cases new 2019 model versions (without any significant changes) get slightly less range than 2018 versions from the EPA.It could be caused by various reasons – more standard equipment (more weight), small aerodynamic changes, software changes to a driving mode or battery buffer. Or even a slight change on the EPA side.Here are a few examples that we noted most recently.See Alsolast_img read more

Elon Musk releases teaser image of Teslas cyberpunk electric pickup truck

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Elon Musk has released the first teaser image of Tesla’s electric pickup truck, which he describes as a ‘cyberpunk’ truck and inspired by Blade Runner. more…The post Elon Musk releases teaser image of Tesla’s ‘cyberpunk’ electric pickup truck appeared first on Electrek.last_img

2016 FCPA Enforcement Sets Another Record – Largest Overall Corporate Settlement Amounts

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. Learn More & Register As highlighted in this prior post, 2016 had already become a record-breaking year on September 30th in terms of the number of corporate Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement actions.With yesterday’s net $420 million FCPA enforcement action against Oderbrecht / Braskem, 2016 has also become a record-breaking year in terms of overall corporate FCPA settlement amounts. [Note,in April 2017 the DOJ trimmed the Odebrecht criminal penalty by $167 million to $93 million (it originally was $260 million). Thus, the overall net FCPA settlement amount is $252 million].Corporate FCPA settlement amounts in 2016 stand at approximately $1.8 billion. (Note: this represents the net number after accounting for various credits and deductions in enforcement actions against foreign companies such as Oderbrecht/Braskem, Embraer, and VimpelCom).Similar to prior large settlement years, just a few corporate enforcement actions in 2016 comprise the bulk of the overall settlement amount. Specifically, VimpelCom, Och-Ziff, Embraer, JPMorgan and Oderbrecht/Braskem make up 88% of the $1.8 billion figure.Set forth below are prior year corporate settlement amounts.2015 – $139 million2014 – $1.6 billion2013 – $720 million2012 – $260 million2011 – $503 million2010 – $1.4 billion2009 – $645 million2008 – $885 million2007 – $149 millionWith prior years as a guide, 2016 FCPA enforcement is far from over, with several high-profile FCPA inquiries still in the pipeline (see here).last_img read more

Severe childhood trauma stresses in parents lives linked to behavioral health problems

first_imgJul 9 2018A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents’ lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children.The types of childhood hardships included divorce or separation of parents, death of or estrangement from a parent, emotional, physical or sexual abuse, witnessing violence in the home, exposure to substance abuse in the household or parental mental illness.”Previous research has looked at childhood trauma as a risk factor for later physical and mental health problems in adulthood, but this is the first research to show that the long-term behavioral health harms of childhood adversity extend across generations from parent to child,” said the study’s lead author, Dr. Adam Schickedanz. He is a pediatrician and health services researcher and assistant professor in the department of pediatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Related StoriesEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairThe study showed that the children of parents who themselves had four or more adverse childhood experiences were at double the risk of having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and were four time more likely to have mental health problems.A mother’s childhood experiences had a stronger adverse effect on a child’s behavioral health than the father’s experiences, the study found.Parents who lived through adverse childhood experiences were more likely to report higher levels of aggravation as parents and to experience mental health problems, the researchers found. However, these mental health and attitude factors only explained about a quarter of the association to their child’s elevated behavioral health risks. The remainder of how the parent’s adverse childhood experiences are transmitted to their child’s behavior deserves further study.The findings add to the evidence supporting standardized assessment of parents for adverse childhood experiences during their child’s pediatric health visits.”If we can identify these children who are at a higher risk, we can connect them to services that might reduce their risk or prevent behavioral health problems,” Schickedanz said.The researchers used information from a national survey containing information from four generations of American families, including information from parents about whether they were abused, neglected or exposed to other family stressors or maltreatment while growing up, and information on their children’s behavior problems and medical diagnoses of attention deficit disorder.With this data, they were able to find strong associations between the parents’ adversity histories and their children’s behavioral health problems, while controlling for factors such as family poverty and education level.The next step for researchers is to look at how resilience factors, such as the support of mentors or teachers, could offset the harms of childhood traumas, Schickedanz said. Source:https://www.uclahealth.org/parents-who-had-severe-stresses-trauma-in-childhood-more-likely-to-have-kids-with-behavioral-health-problemslast_img read more

NIH rushes to spend a 150 million pediatric research windfall

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is scrambling this year to spend a windfall of more than $150 million on pediatric research. And things could get a little hairy, judging from an outside advisory panel’s reaction Friday to the agency’s initial public airing of its plans.“Given the diffuse nature of what you have described, and its complexity, I don’t want to use the word ‘nuts’, but it’s a daunting challenge,” Lila Gierasch of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, told Principal Deputy NIH Director Lawrence Tabak after his presentation to a Council of Councils meeting in Bethesda, Maryland. “Thank you for changing ‘nuts’ to ‘challenging,’ ” Tabak replied, tongue-in-cheek. “We’re just trying to do what makes the most sense, and multiply the potential value of the resources available to us.”The situation is certainly unusual for the $30 billion agency, where a succession of flat budgets has meant plunging success rate on grant proposals. But NIH is just following orders from Congress regarding two separate research initiatives to help children.center_img Last spring, legislators passed the Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act, authorizing NIH to spend $126 million over 10 years for pediatric research. In December, they gave NIH its first $12.6 million installment. Taken together, the authorization plus the appropriation represented a kind of belt-and-suspenders approach to making sure that NIH follows through on lawmakers’ interest in having the agency do more to understand and find cures for everything from pediatric cancer and juvenile arthritis to adolescent suicide and obesity.Simultaneously, NIH pulled the plug on its controversial National Children’s Study (NCS), which was supposed to monitor various environmental and psychosocial factors affecting a cohort of 100,000 children from before birth to age 21. So Congress ordered NIH to find other uses for the $165 million that lawmakers had already allocated in the final 2015 spending bill for the massive study. Some money will go to shutter the existing Vanguard study and related activities, leaving approximately $140 million for new initiatives.NIH officials have spent the past 6 weeks reacting to that whirlwind of legislative activity and plotting their next moves. Although the two pots of money are distinct, they hoped to use each to capitalize on the rash of new technologies that allow researchers to collect and analyze vast amounts of information. On Friday, they presented their preliminary plans to the council.Kids FirstThe money from the Kids First initiative is expected to help enrich any number of children’s studies already under way, said Elizabeth Wilder, head of the Common Fund, which coordinates trans-NIH research programs. “The goal is to mine the information across cohorts to address compelling questions in pediatric research,” she told the council. “We want to develop a rich resource for the pediatric community.”Some council members were put off, however, by such a generic description of the research plan. “I’m not as excited as I’d like to be,” said one. “I’m trying to imagine what I would do with this database.” Another council member characterized NIH’s plan as “‘we’ve got the capacity for Big Data, so let’s apply it to kids.’”Wilder admitted that the scope of the research to be covered has not been determined. “We do not have a Kids First definition of when childhood ends,” she said in response to a question on whether studies involving drug abuse and mental illness would be part of the initiative. (Miller, the law’s namesake, died of cancer at the age of 10, and sponsors of the legislation routinely refer to it as supporting research on pediatric cancer.) Another council member wanted to know if studies of adult outcomes of such disorders would also be fair game.But the initial uncertainty didn’t bother Marlene Belfort, a professor at the University at Albany, State University of New York. “I think there is more enthusiasm for this project than I heard 25 years ago when we started to discuss the Human Genome Project,” she remarked. “And look at how much we learned from that.”The pediatric research initiative, like the genome project, is expected to be a multiyear effort. And the idea won broad, bipartisan support because it was touted as revenue-neutral: Its funding comes from ending federal support for political conventions for each party’s presidential candidate, now funded through a $3 checkoff on tax returns.Some $38 million from the election fund was set aside last spring for the NIH initiative, and Representative Tom Cole (R–OK) has introduced a bill to transfer another $88 million to NIH by completely eliminating the checkoff mechanism, which also funds presidential campaigns. However, Congress funds federal agencies on an annual basis, so the money for Kids First must be appropriated every year.Children’s study windfallBy contrast, the money from the canceled children’s study is a one-time windfall. It must be spent, or at least committed, before the 2015 fiscal year ends on 30 September. Congress also attached two strings to the money, Tabak told the council: NIH must “remain true to the original intent of the study, to examine questions at the intersection of pediatric health and the environment, and we must also do a better job of engaging underrepresented communities.”Moving quickly, a group of institute directors and senior NIH officials have cobbled together three options for spending the NCS money. As Tabak described them, the first would focus on developing and employing new tools, like biosensors, to track the impact of environmental factors on pediatric diseases. The second would study the “seeds” of future diseases by monitoring factors that affect children before and after birth. The third would broaden existing studies to include more environmental factors. The goal, Tabak explained, “is to develop tools and approaches that, if successful, could be applied to many existing cohort studies.”Tabak acknowledged that he was being vague, which prompted Gierasch’s comment about how much more work NIH needs to do in a very short amount of time. But Tabak said NIH faced an even greater challenge in 2009, when Congress bestowed $10 billion on the agency as part of the government’s stimulus package in the wake of the financial meltdown. “Did we get it perfect then? Maybe not,” he said. “But I think it worked out pretty well in the end.”Several council members suggested specific areas that NIH should consider in any future solicitation to spend the NCS money, leading Tabak to warn that “we need to strike a balance between trying to be all things to all people and delivering something useful.” He said the advantage of emphasizing the development of new tools is that “you can tailor them” to whatever studies NIH decides to fund down the road.Tabak didn’t offer a timeline for making decisions on how to distribute the NCS money. Wilder said that she hoped NIH leadership would decide “in early spring” how the first year of Kids First funds would be spent. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Saturns moon has a fluffy heart

first_imgSaturn’s moon, Enceladus, may not have a heart of stone—at least, not completely. A new model suggests the satellite has a rubble-filled pile of boulders and ice at its core, rather than a more conventional solid stone center. This “fluffy core” could help solve the mystery of the moon’s underground ocean. A watery layer beneath Enceladus’s crust has long been suspected to exist because of the constant eruption of geysers at its southern pole. But scientists have said that any such ocean should have frozen over the lifetime of the Saturn system. Tidal heating that warms the insides of moons and planets in orbit would simply not be enough to keep this ocean in a liquid state if Enceladus had a solid core. And antifreezing agents such as ammonia would eventually separate from the water if they were present in large enough amounts to prevent ice from forming. But this new model makes antifreeze irrelevant while resurrecting the tidal heating hypothesis: A heart of rubble would flex more easily with the tidal pull of Saturn, emitting enough heat to maintain a liquid layer. And scientists say this is perfectly plausible. If temperatures never climbed high enough to melt the boulders and pebbles at the moon’s heart into a single, solid core, it would have remained a rocky rubble pile, extending the liquid lifetime of Enceladus’s underground ocean.last_img read more

Can terrorists be deradicalized

first_img By Michael PriceMay. 26, 2017 , 11:00 AM Rex Features/Associated Press Q: Why are there so many deradicalization programs in the United States and abroad, despite little evidence they work?A: Citizens, policymakers, and security officials have come to recognize that we cannot arrest or kill our way out of this problem. We can physically defeat groups like ISIS or other violent extremist and terrorist groups, but this leaves their appeal untouched or even strengthened.Q: Is it dangerous to implement deradicalization techniques before they’ve been proven?A: Using the wrong methods could cause a lot of damage. It could mean not detecting a high-risk person, or even shielding him from the authorities. The fact that a person is in a deradicalization program could make security officials and people in his community less vigilant, blinding them to his continued danger.Q: What are the hurdles to assessing the efficacy of deradicalization programs?A: There are many. First, there are no generally used definitions and concepts in the field, making it difficult to even find out if everyone is talking about the same thing. “Deradicalization” versus “disengagement,” for example, are concepts that sometimes are used to mean the same thing and sometimes aren’t. Also, we don’t know when a deradicalization case is considered to be finished, or how to measure recidivism. So we need standardization in the basic definitions.When it comes to specific metrics, to use recidivism as an example, we do not have any base rates for terrorists who do not go through a program. Does recidivism only count as going back to the same terrorist group? What about going back to the same ideology? What about a different violent extremist ideology? Or does it simply mean any form of crime?Q: How should a good program evaluation be structured? A: In each program, there are multiple factors like staff training, risk assessment, case ranking, individually adapted treatment methods, double-blind peer review, etc. Each can be graded by an evaluator and an overall score can provide a measure we call structural integrity. This does not necessarily measure a program’s impact in any particular case, but rather whether it’s capable of having a positive impact. Any individual outcome depends on so many additional uncontrollable variables, but a program’s structural integrity tells us whether it can work at all.Q: Can deradicalization programs help with “lone wolf” attackers who aren’t formally part of any terrorist group?A: We know that in the vast majority of “lone wolf” cases, family and friends knew about the radicalization process or attack plan. Just look at the recent Manchester concert bombing case, where the attacker’s friends and community members made multiple attempts to alert the authorities. What deradicalization provides is a program in the middle acting as some sort of communicative bridge between security officials, family members, and communities. But the basic mechanism is the same across all groups: You need to have access to the radicalized person, identify the factors driving their ideology, design an intervention plan, and then track its impact.Q: Your commentary in the journal accompanies a research paper that found that Colombian paramilitary terrorists tend to believe that ends justify means to an extreme degree. How likely is it that these and other findings in the academic literature would generalize to other terrorist organizations’ ideologies?A: I strongly believe that the main methods and dynamics behind deradicalization research can be applied across different terrorist organizations and cultures. Research has shown a great deal of overlap regarding people’s individual motives for joining and leaving terrorist groups. Of course, the program type and structure must be adapted to each circumstance, but in the end, it’s about discovering the nature of a person’s bond to the terrorist group and ideology, and to design a tailored exit strategy for that person. Deradicalization programs that might help prevent events like the Manchester concert bombing (above) have been largely untested. Can terrorists be deradicalized? Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Investigators are still piecing together exactly what drove Salman Abedi, the suspected assailant in the recent concert bombing in Manchester, U.K., to kill 22 people and wound dozens more, but early indications suggest he had become a radicalized jihadist. How formerly harmless members of society go on to embrace violent extremist ideologies is a looming question in the world of counterterrorism, yet increasingly so is the problem of “deradicalization,” or convincing people to abandon an extremist mindset.Worldwide, hundreds of deradicalization programs have sprung up. They typically consist of trained counselors either convincing the extremists their religious views aren’t founded in proper theology, treating the subject’s extremism as a mental health issue, or trying to nudge the extremist’s value system away from violence.Despite their ubiquity, there’s been precious little effort spent evaluating whether these programs actually work, writes Daniel Koehler, director of the German Institute on Radicalization and De-radicalization Studies based in Stuttgart, in a commentary published today in Nature Human Behaviour. He discussed his work with Science, as well as the dangers of failing to establish deradicalization program standards. The interview has been edited for clarity and brevity.last_img read more

Updated Researchers rally around science advocate convicted in Egypt

first_img By Erik StokstadSep. 13, 2017 , 5:15 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Updated: Researchers rally around science advocate convicted in Egypt Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe *Update, 13 September, 5:15 p.m.: A new letter of support for Serageldin includes 90 Nobel Prize winners, 20 heads of state, and some 150 scholars. More information can be found here. The court will hear his appeal next week. Here is our original story from 11 August:Scientists, engineers, and others are hoping an Egyptian court will reconsider a prison sentence given to one of the nation’s most prominent science advocates. Last week, in a surprising outcome, an Egyptian judge sentenced Ismail Serageldin, founding director of Egypt’s Library of Alexandria, to 3.5 years in prison for financial misdemeanors. Serageldin has appealed the 31 July verdict, and this week more than 180 scientists, engineers, physicians, and public figures issued a declaration of support (in Arabic) on his behalf.Serageldin directed the library, also known as the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, and its 14 affiliated research institutes and museums, from 2001 until he retired this year. Previously, he worked as an economist at the World Bank and chaired the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research, which helps steer a global network of research facilities. After the 2011 revolution in Egypt, several employees at the library accused Serageldin and three colleagues of misusing public funds. Of 118 charges, the judge dismissed all but three: not giving some employees enough work, improperly canceling life insurance policies, and improperly renting out cafeterias at the library. Supporters of Serageldin expected the Court of Misdemeanors in Alexandria to also toss out those charges. But the judge instead sentenced Serageldin to prison; his colleagues received 6- to 18-month terms. Email D.shennawy/Wikimedia Commons Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) In a statement posted on Facebook on 1 August, Serageldin wrote (in Arabic) that he had “adhered to all local and international laws.” Serageldin expects to be back in court next month for a hearing on his appeal. Meanwhile, he remains free.Farouk El-Baz, a space scientist at Boston University and member of the library’s advisory board, is optimistic that the appeals court will overturn the conviction. “It will be OK,” he says. “His hand is clean and his conscience is clear.” Ismail Serageldinlast_img read more

DOEs maverick climate model is about to get its first test

first_img The project pulled in researchers from eight DOE national labs. It began as a carbon copy of the CESM and retains similar atmosphere and land models, but includes new ocean, sea-ice, river, and soil biochemistry simulations. The DOE team doubled the number of vertical layers, extended the atmosphere higher, and adopted a number-crunching method that is computationally intensive but may be easier to break into chunks and run in parallel on the anticipated exascale machines. “For them, it makes a lot of sense to go in that direction,” says Richard Neale, a climate scientist at NCAR.In 2017, after President Donald Trump took office and pulled the nation out of the Paris climate accords, DOE dropped “climate” from the project name. The new name, the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM), better reflects the model’s focus on the entire Earth system, says project leader David Bader of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.The E3SM’s first results highlight its potential; they include model runs with ultrasharp, 25-kilometer-wide grid cells—fine enough to simulate small-scale features such as ocean eddies and mountain snow packs. But this sharp picture is still too coarse to resolve individual clouds and atmospheric convection, major factors limiting models’ precision. And some scientists doubt it will improve forecasts. The last intercomparison effort, which ended in 2014, included 26 modeling groups—nine more than the previous round—yet yielded collective predictions that were no more precise. “Just having more models—I don’t think there’s any evidence that that’s key to advancing the field,” says Bjorn Stevens, a climate scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany, and co-leader of the new intercomparison, code-named CMIP6.Gavin Schmidt, who heads NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, which also produces a global climate model, questions the new model’s rationale, given that DOE’s exascale computers do not yet exist. “No one knows what these machines will even look like, so it’s hard to build models for them ahead of time,” he wrote on Twitter. And the computational intensity of the E3SM has drawbacks, says Hansi Singh, a PNNL climate scientist who uses the CESM for her research. The sheer number of calculations needed to get a result with the E3SM would overwhelm most university clusters, limiting outside scientists’ ability to use it.One preliminary result, on the climate’s sensitivity to carbon dioxide (CO2), will “raise some eyebrows,” Bader says. Most models estimate that, for a doubling of CO2 above preindustrial levels, average global temperatures will rise between 1.5°C and 4.5°C. The E3SM predicts a strikingly high rise of 5.2°C, which Leung suspects is due to the way the model handles aerosols and clouds. And like many models, the E3SM produces two bands of rainfall in the tropics, rather than the one seen in nature near the equator.The first test of the E3SM will be its performance in CMIP6. Nearly three dozen modeling groups, including newcomers from South Korea, India, Brazil, and South Africa, are expected to submit results to the intercomparison between now and 2020. Each group will devote thousands of computer-hours to standard scenarios, such as simulating the impact of a 1% per year CO2 increase and an abrupt quadrupling of it.But given the plodding rate of improvement since previous intercomparisons, few are expecting the E3SM or any other model to yield revolutionary insights. Stevens hopes to revise the exercise to encourage innovations, such as modeling the climate at the 1-kilometer resolution needed to make out individual clouds, or campaigns to gather new kinds of data. “The whole premise of CMIP is trying to get everyone to do the same thing,” he says. “Everyone knows that breakthroughs come from getting people to do different things.” MATHEW MALTRUD, LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ON BEHALF OF THE E3SM PROJECT (LA-UR-18-23682) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Gabriel PopkinMay. 3, 2018 , 1:20 PMcenter_img DOE’s maverick climate model is about to get its first test Email A new model simulates a North Atlantic hurricane and the cold seas (yellow) left in its wake. The world’s growing collection of climate models has a high-profile new entry. Last week, after nearly 4 years of work, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released computer code and initial results from an ambitious effort to simulate the Earth system. The new model is tailored to run on future supercomputers and designed to forecast not just how climate will change, but also how those changes might stress energy infrastructure.Results from an upcoming comparison of global models may show how well the new entrant works. But so far it is getting a mixed reception, with some questioning the need for another model and others saying the $80 million effort has yet to improve predictions of the future climate. Even the project’s chief scientist, Ruby Leung of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, acknowledges that the model is not yet a leader. “We really don’t expect that our model will be wowing the world,” she says.Since the 1960s, climate modelers have used computers to build virtual globes. They break the atmosphere and ocean into thousands of boxes and assign weather conditions to each one. The toy worlds then evolve through simulated centuries, following the laws of physics. Historically, DOE’s major role in climate modeling was contributing to the Community Earth System Model (CESM), an effort based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. But in July 2014, DOE launched its Accelerated Climate Model for Energy. The goal was to predict how storms and rising seas could affect power plants, dams, and other energy infrastructure, and to focus on regions such as North America or the Arctic. DOE officials also wanted a model that could run on a generation of megapowerful “exascale” computers expected to turn on around 2021.last_img read more

Citizen science needs to look more like society report says

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Natural History Library/Alamy Stock Photo A citizen science project to monitor climate change in California’s Joshua Tree National Park Scientists who team up with the public to conduct research need to do a better job of including all segments of society. That’s one of the key recommendations in a new report on citizen science by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, D.C.“Citizen science project designers must grapple with issues of equity, diversity, power, and inclusion,” says the report, written by a 12-member committee chaired by Rajul Pandya of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), also in Washington, D.C. “They face these issues even if they do not set out to address diversity in their project and even when they are not consciously aware that these factors are at play in their project.”The phrase “citizen science” covers both projects in which scientists enlist the public—using volunteers for a bird census or to monitor air and water quality, for example—and those in which residents seek help with a problem that requires technical know-how, such as assessing how rising temperatures might affect their community. Millions of people participate in such efforts, which can educate nonscientists about technical topics, show how science can benefit society, and broaden the scope of a particular research project. Tapping a larger audience for these projects would benefit both scientists and the public, says Pandya, who runs AGU’s Thriving Earth Exchange, a 5-year-old community science initiative that supports 70 projects throughout the United States and around the world. But the report warns against assuming that nonprofessionals will automatically learn about science by participating. “You have to design for it,” says Pandya, who’s based in Boulder, Colorado. “And that’s also true for equity and diversity.”The burgeoning field of citizen science has its own professional associations and journals. But practitioners have not done a good job of documenting who participates, the report notes. An appendix refers to “an assumption” that participants are “generally white, older/retired females with an above-average education.” However, the evidence to support that assumption is so weak that the panel conducted its own meta-analysis of the literature.That effort also came up short, Pandya acknowledges, because so many projects have failed to collect and analyze the demographics of participants or document the knowledge they have gained. At the same time, what the panel found supports the perception of an “overwhelmingly white and well-educated population” that is likely to participate repeatedly in citizen science projects.That repetition can reinforce learning, Pandya says. He says that’s also true about other core elements of citizen science, such as giving laypersons a personal stake in the outcome and involving them in a communal activity.Citizen science projects can also teach scientists something about themselves and their profession, Pandya says. In an unusually personal preface to the report, he argues that “citizen science poses questions about who participates in science, what it means to participate in science, who gets to decide what scientific questions to investigate, and even what kind of knowledge and practice count as science.”center_img Citizen science needs to look more like society, report says Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jeffrey MervisNov. 1, 2018 , 4:40 PM Emaillast_img read more

Trump emphasizes workforce training in new vision for STEM education

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A new federal science, technology, engineering, and math education plan highlights the value of apprenticeships, such as the one enrolling these two apprentices at a highly automated Stihl chainsaw manufacturing plant in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The U.S. government needs to partner with industry and community organizations to train more Americans for jobs in an increasingly high-tech work environment. That’s the key message in a new 5-year strategic plan for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education released today by U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration.The plan, which looks across the federal government’s entire $3 billion investment in STEM education by more than a dozen agencies, emphasizes the importance of computational literacy and the value of blending the arts, social science, and other fields in “authentic” STEM learning experiences. The 45-page report also commits federal agencies to be more transparent in tallying participation in STEM programs by minorities and women, which it acknowledges “face barriers to success.”At the same time, the report largely dismisses several key priorities of former President Barack Obama’s administration, including the need to train more STEM elementary and secondary school teachers, strengthen the STEM curriculum, and improve undergraduate and graduate instruction to prevent would-be scientists and engineers from leaving the field. There’s also no mention of whether Trump will once again seek cuts to several STEM education programs when he releases his 2020 budget request in February 2019—a suggestion that Congress has so far twice ignored. Emailcenter_img John Minchillo/AP Photo Trump emphasizes workforce training in new vision for STEM education By Jeffrey MervisDec. 3, 2018 , 8:00 PM “We want to reconnect the education systems with the employers that await them,” says Jeffrey Weld, the administration’s point person for STEM education within the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). “A chasm has emerged, and you can speculate on when it emerged,” says Weld, a former science teacher and STEM education administrator in Iowa who has spent 18 months shepherding this congressionally mandated report through an interagency committee. “Education products, that is, graduates, by many indicators, don’t appear to align with the expectations of the employers.”Cashing in on STEMThe Trump administration has taken an approach to STEM education that differs markedly from how the topic was addressed under Obama and previous Republican and Democratic administrations. For Trump, STEM education appears almost entirely to be a means to an end—a way for students to find and hold a good job once they leave school—rather than a description of what goes on inside the classroom, or the lab bench, and in their daily lives.The new strategic plan pays scant attention to how to improve what happens in those traditional educational settings. Instead, it extols the value of apprenticeships, retraining programs, and other opportunities that give people the technical skills they will need to keep up with a changing workplace.“To me, the biggest benefits [of the plan are] its links to the larger administration focus on apprenticeships and the American worker,” says Michael Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president for technology policy and de facto head of OSTP pending the Senate confirmation of Kelvin Droegemeier, Trump’s nominee to head the office. “STEM education is absolutely critical to supporting the American worker, and this plan brings together a number of programs that are part of our emphasis on the American worker.”France Córdova, director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Alexandria, Virginia, played a leading role in formulating the plan as co-chair of the interagency committee on STEM education. Joining in a press call this afternoon with reporters, Córdova mentioned several NSF initiatives already underway as examples of what the federal government hopes to achieve over the next 5 years. NSF’s INCLUDES program to broaden participation will be adopted by several other agencies, she noted, and NSF’s Innovation Corps initiative to train scientists to become more entrepreneurial has already been taken up by other agencies.“This plan is about connecting diversity and inclusion with the opportunity for our country to be even stronger in innovation,” she explains. The goal, she adds, is “to capture all the talent that is already resident in our country and make sure that every American has the opportunity to be exposed to STEM.”The strategic plan will be formally unveiled Tuesday morning at a White House event, kicking off what Weld and Córdova said was a yearlong process of prodding federal agencies to spell out how they plan to implement its objectives. A senior administration official said any budget implications of the plan will be unveiled in the president’s 2020 budget request.In the meantime, Weld said he hoped state and local officials will take to heart the importance of documenting their efforts to improve STEM education. “We don’t have any authority over the states, obviously,” says Weld, a reference to the federal government’s limited role in education under the U.S. Constitution. “This is a North Star, a rallying call, and that’s all it is. But we hope to set an example, so when states, or local partnerships or industries, or local Cub Scout troops or robotics teams, are engaged in STEM, that they, too, are measuring and reporting what they are doing.”last_img read more